You are here

Available in: EnglishEspañolPortuguês

Study Proposes Public Policy Priorities for Colombian Cities in Accordance with their Social Development

Report classifies the country’s 23 main cities into six groups: elderly, mature, adult, big and young, adolescent and embryonic.

31 March 2015|News

bannercolombia.jpg

View of Colombia's capital.
Vista geral da cidade de Bogotá.
Imagem: Luis Ramírez/EFE.

A new study by the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) classifies Colombia’s 23 main cities into six groups according to their social development levels, and proposes priorities in differentiated public policies tailored to each metropolis’ stage of demographic transition.

The report Differentiated Social Policies for Cities in Colombia: A New Generation of Social Policies (only available in Spanish) distinguishes between cities that are elderly, mature, adult, big and young, adolescent and embryonic, according to their demographic features, levels of economic poverty and poverty in terms of rights and opportunities, and their state of education, health, the labor market and institutions.

The cities in each group share fairly common features that distinguish them from the rest. This categorization enables analysts to propose diverse public policy lines of action according to their multidimensional performance and to incorporate in their design the importance of demographic trends, especially with regard to young people and older persons.

Bogota, Medellin, Bucaramanga, Pereira, Manizales and Tunja are among the elderly cities, which the study says must concentrate on improvements in the quality of education, job market developments, care programs (particularly for older persons), and policies to attract young people.

Cali and Armenia are considered mature cities. These must strengthen institutions that provide social services and develop care programs for older people, while also trying to reduce their economic poverty levels.

Ibague, Neiva, Popayan and Pasto make up the adult cities, whose main challenges are to consolidate social achievements, promote the development of a higher-quality job market, reduce poverty, begin care programs for older people, and fortify their institutions.

Meanwhile, big and young cities—which include Barranquilla, Cartagena, Cucuta and Villavicencio—must work to achieve quality education services, strengthen institutions, overcome deficits in housing and public services, and define production and employment paths.

For the so-called adolescent cities, such as Santa Marta, Monteria, Valledupar, Sincelejo and Florencia, the study suggests that they should accelerate basic social services coverage until universality is achieved, reinforce policies aimed at the care, protection and education of children, and reduce teenage pregnancy.

Finally, the main challenges for Riohacha and Quibdo, described as embryonic cities, are achieving minimal goals of universality in social development in terms of health, education, housing and public services, as well as confronting the high levels of indigence and developing public institutions.

This document, prepared by ECLAC’s Office in Bogota, was initiated as part of an agreement with UN Habitat for a project called The City System of Colombia’s National Planning Department. It was also used to create the foundations for the National Development Plan 2014-2018: Everyone for a New Country. 

Meanwhile, big and young cities—which include Barranquilla, Cartagena, Cucuta and Villavicencio—must work to achieve quality education services, strengthen institutions, overcome deficits in housing and public services, and define production and employment paths.

For the so-called adolescent cities, such as Santa Marta, Monteria, Valledupar, Sincelejo and Florencia, the study suggests that they should accelerate basic social services coverage until universality is achieved, reinforce policies aimed at the care, protection and education of children, and reduce teenage pregnancy.

Finally, the main challenges for Riohacha and Quibdo, described as embryonic cities, are achieving minimal goals of universality in social development in terms of health, education, housing and public services, as well as confronting the high levels of indigence and developing public institutions.

This document, prepared by ECLAC’s Office in Bogota, was initiated as part of an agreement with UN Habitat for a project called The City System of Colombia’s National Planning Department. It was also used to create the foundations for the National Development Plan 2014-2018: Everyone for a New Country. 

Contact

Subscription

Get ECLAC updates by email

Subscribe